Loved the Rosie Project

I finished the Rosie Project last night. It was 10.44 PM when I got up from the yellow Ikea reading chair. I had begun the read at 4.30 AM after downloading it on Borrow Box using my local Darebin library membership. I had chosen to download the e-AudioBook version of the book. At the back of my mind was the project – stuff my brain with specific diction – which I researched and did not follow up. This was a project to extend my diction in many different directions. I can Speak English in a few differed ways – multiple Indian ways, but also can do a smattering of Japanese-English, Singlish. Listening to an eAudio book would insert a substantial amount of audio content into my brain – and would be stored there till I accessed it. This book would no doubt be spoken of in the Melbourne-Educated voice. This is a form of hybrid intonation that would contain both the Urban-metropolitan Australian nuances, plus the standard university educated minimisation of local intonations. This voice would be fitting in to a standard-english mode stripped off the colloquial local and socialised intonations. Not posh – just stripped back and pickled. With delicious overtones of the American ‘a’ intoned sporadically for effect, and the conscious attempt at the rounded ‘o’ to denote every so often – responding to the need to have a confusing impact upon the listener.

The usage of the word ‘bastard’ is a case in example. It can be deployed in multiple ways. Its a great word that can be used as a ‘boy hug’ – “you bastard” slowly issuing from the mouth of a colleague is a great way to say “I fucking love you mate”. The ‘a’ in affection is rounded – the flattened ‘a’ in this word would confuse the listener: is this is a quote from a film? For effect the ‘b’ can be used as a projectile, with popping lips.

I am Soumitri of South Indian Extraction, height 167 and BMI 23.7. Average on all scores and statistically normal. No special distinguishing features. Balding, occasionally vegetarian, non-smoker, monogamous, Sporadic quantified-selfer, User of multiple scheduling apps (desultorily). Intellectually I am prone to binge projects – learn hebrew (not all that well), run (reasonably well – though not pushing the limit, desultory). I checked a few times, doing a mental assessment, to see if I figured on the Autism scale. I am hopeless in social gatherings. I can get worked up after social events. I like to work alone. I do not want to play the academic grants game. I would rather do interesting research that is not beholden to money making. Am I like Don (the main chracter in the book). There is a lot to like in Don.

the-rosie-project

Very early into the reading of the book (I should have said into the listening) I had an impulse that I have had often with authors – my particular and very special favourites being Andrea Camilleri and Shane Maloney. I would love to have coffee with this author. I stopped the audio just as Don was putting the lobster into the freezer. I went and had a look at Graeme Simsion. Then I had a read of a few reviews. There was a lot to like (“Warm-hearted and perfectly pitched, with profound themes that are worn lightly, this very enjoyable read promises to put Don Tillman on the comic literary map somewhere between Mr Pooter and Adrian Mole. Through his battles to understand and empathise with other humans, Don teaches us to see the funny side of our own often incomprehensible behaviour – and to embrace the differently abled.”) and not like (“The Rosie Project is 1930s screwball comedy updated for 2013.”) in the reviews.

I am prone to preferring the notion of affection in my engagement with literary charatecres of this genre.

I loved the book. I cried at many points. I stayed with the book. I stand with the voice of the narrator. I finished the book in a day.

If you want your treat in audio this is a gorgeous morsel.

I am next going to have a look at/ a listen of:

“The Rosie Effect – the book’s sequel, released last September, about the birth of the professor’s child with Rosie – was recently named by Bill Gates as one of his five favourite reads of 2014.”
http://www.smh.com.au/good-weekend/literary-double-act-anne-buist-and-graeme-simsion-20150112-12mbhh.html

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