The MEDP Project

The overall objective of MEDP is to help in building the capacity of midwifery and maternal health in India. It is closely linked with the material health policy under the National Rural Health Mission (NRHM) and the Reproductive and Child Health (RCH) programme of the Goverment of India which aim at the development of SBA (midwifery) and EmOC as key strategies for decreasing maternal mortality rate.

This Project is coordinated by IIM, Ahmedabad, and is being implemented through the core group of institutions including ANS, Hydrabad; TNAI, SOMI and WRAI/CEDPA in India. The coordination institution in Sweden is Karolinska Institute, Division of Reproductive and Perinatal Health. The Sweden Association of Midwives is provoding technical assistance.

via Welcome to MEDP.

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Continuity, change and collaboration in midwifery: from Japan, memories of a midwife at 95 years of age; and from India, news of a new project to improve midwifery education and care for safe motherhood | International Midwifery | Find Articles at BNET

RELATED ARTICLE: Indian midwifery delegation to the Netherlands and Sweden.

ICM member association, the Society of Midwives of India, is carrying out a project called ‘Developing inter-institutional collaboration for improving midwifery and EMOC services in India’.

The partner organisations in Europe are the Karolinska Institute, Sweden, and the Swedish Association of Midwives; and in India, the Academy for Nursing Studies, the Trained Nurses’ Association of India (TNAI), White Ribbon Alliance of India and the Indian Institute of Management (IIM).

The project’s main components are the strengthening of midwifery and emergency obstetric services for Sate Motherhood. It involves the establishment of three centres of advanced midwifery training in different parts of India.

via Continuity, change and collaboration in midwifery: from Japan, memories of a midwife at 95 years of age; and from India, news of a new project to improve midwifery education and care for safe motherhood | International Midwifery | Find Articles at BNET.

Drop the Demon Dai: Maternal Mortality and the State in Colonial Madras, 1840-1875 — Lang 18 (3): 357 — Social History of Medicine

Drop the Demon Dai: Maternal Mortality and the State in Colonial Madras, 1840–1875

Seán Lang

Anglia Polytechnic University, East Road, Cambridge CB1 1PT, UK. E-mail: sf_lang@hotmail.com

Writing on midwifery and women’s health in nineteenth-century India has concentrated on the role of medical missionaries and on voluntary organizations, such as the Countess of Dufferin’s Fund; the role of the state has been generally discounted. However, a close study of government records from Madras Presidency suggests that there was considerable state interest in the issue from the 1840s onwards. This took the form of running and supporting a major lying-in hospital in Madras and smaller lying-in wards at provincial dispensaries, in order to train midwives to work throughout the Presidency. State action was heavily influenced by revulsion at the methods of the dai, the traditional Indian birth attendant. The strategy both at Madras and elsewhere was to replace her with a class of Indian trained midwives who would operate within the community. Various explanations for state interest in the issue are suggested, including political rivalry between the different British Presidencies.

via Drop the Demon Dai: Maternal Mortality and the State in Colonial Madras, 1840-1875 — Lang 18 (3): 357 — Social History of Medicine.

604 Dileep Mavalankar at al, Strengthening midwifery services

Strengthening midwifery services

DILEEP MAVALANKAR, KRANTI VORA and BHARATI SHARMA

Over the last few years some states and NGOs in India have developed interesting models of midwife-nurse based maternal health care services supported by needed emergency obstetric care services. For example, in Tamil Nadu, the government has developed a model of primary health care centres staffed by three nurses to provide a 24-hour service for childbirth. Tamil Nadu has also established a good system of recording all maternal deaths and conducting a maternal death inquiry to find preventable factors. It has also developed centres for emergency obstetric care throughout the state.

Similarly, the Academy of Nursing Studies, Hyderabad has developed a nurse-based model of maternal care in the Medak district through the government health system. Arth, an NGO has developed a nurse-based model in rural and tribal areas of Udaipur district by appointing its own nurses for a cluster of villages. The Swedish Sida-assisted midwifery and maternal healthcare development project coordinated by IIM Ahmedabad, is also trying to help develop midwifery training, practice and research in five states in India through teacher training, skill training of ANM and networking with Swedish partners. The Indian Nursing Council has also developed a one-year curriculum for training nurses to become practitioners of midwifery. CEDPA with help from Jhpeigo has developed a model of skill-based training of midwives in rural Jharkhand.

via 604 Dileep Mavalankar at al, Strengthening midwifery services.

Govt nod for setting up 132 nursing and midwifery schools – India – The Times of India

NEW DELHI: The Government gave its go ahead for setting up 132 nursing and midwifery schools across the country at a cost of Rs 660 crore.

The proposal for setting up the schools during the XIth plan was cleared by the Cabinet Committee on Economic Affairs.

The schools will be set up in high-focus states like Bihar, Chhattisgarh, Himachal Pradesh, Jharkhand, Jammu and Kashmir, Madhya Pradesh, North Eastern States, Orissa, Rajasthan, Uttarakhand, Uttar Pradesh, West Bengal and other districts in the country, preferably which do not have auxiliary nursing and midwifery schools.

via Govt nod for setting up 132 nursing and midwifery schools – India – The Times of India.

Birth in India: One Chosen Perspective – by Diane Smith

Birth in India: One Chosen Perspective

by Diane Smith

[Editor’s note: This article first appeared in Midwifery Today Issue 61, Spring 2002.]

“There are 700,000 traditional healers and dais (midwives) in India. 70 percent of the nation’s babies are born at home and the dai’s work is a living tradition. Ironically, modern hospitals and public health clinics fully represent allopathic medicine. There is a precarious balance being kept here between these paradigms of care. Women are being coerced and convinced by government advertising programs to leave the home and all that is traditional to give birth in environments that suggest safety and promise degradation. It is my feeling that we face a highly critical time here of losing a primal force—an ancient way—to a superficial, transient understanding of the birth process. The scales remain tipped toward tradition, while the trend is galloping toward the worst of western medicine’s offerings in childbirth technology. I am grateful to be sending down roots into an India that provides me the freedom to witness change, to practice the art of midwifery without tied hands, and to have a role in recultivating women’s power in childbirth through teaching and serving women. The sorrows lie in seeing women being beaten, ridiculed, abandoned, butchered and neglected in their hospital experiences. The joys are in remaining at home within tradition, teaching village dais and adding to the enhancement of their skills and in providing attitudes of sensitive care to government-trained midwives in the small health center here in Auroville, Tamil Nadu where I live.

via Birth in India: One Chosen Perspective – by Diane Smith.